McGillycuddy’s Reeks

16th July 2012

With Lugnaquilia and Galtymore climbed, it was time to head for the southwest and County Kerry.  Back in 1998, we had holidayed in Kerry.  Iain (then aged 15) and I had climbed Brandon Mountain, then a few days later, Iain, Catherine and I had done the round of Caher, Carrauntoohill and Beenkeragh.

With Iain on Brandon Mountain (July 1998), looking along the tricky east ridge

With Cat and Iain, on the west top of Caher, looking towards Carrauntoohill, July 1998

Both were great days, although the highest summits had been in the mist on both walks;  Lugnaquilia and Galtymore had continued that damp Irish tradition.

So, all that remained on my target list were the 5 tops of McGillycuddy’s Reeks.

We camped just west of Kenmare on the Beara peninsula, and for several days the cloud stayed stubbornly low.  The “reeks” were well named!  Meanwhile, we made the best of it by exploring the Beara peninsula, with its colourful villages and amazing “heath-robinson” cable car to Dursey Island.

brightly coloured houses in Eyeries on the Beara peninsula

the Dursey Island cable car - not for the faint-hearted!

After a few days, we decided that it would be better to be nearer the mountains, so we drove over Moll’s Gap to camp at Fossa, just north of Killarney.  From the campsite, we could see the “reeks”, still with their heads in the clouds!

McGillycuddy's Reeks from above Killarney

Our first morning started drizzly, but I decided to go for it anyway – otherwise, we might have to wait long enough for a clear day!  Anne declined to join me, and instead enjoyed a 25 mile cycle round the Killarney loughs.

A short drive up some narrow roads took me to Cronin’s Yard – a small group of houses including a gift shop and eatery.  I was the only car in the car park at 10am.  However, the forecast was set to improve, so I set off up the broad track towards Hags Glen.  Some guys were busy starting to erect a marquee in the field just beyond the car park.  Not sure who was more to be pitied – them struggling with the canvas in the drizzle, or me setting off towards a murky mountain range!

Looking up the valley towards the Hag's Teeth

Looking up the valley towards the Hag's Teeth

To begin with, I followed  the main path towards Carrauntoohill, Ireland’s highest peak, but that wasn’t my destination.  Instead, after about 1km, I headed off to the left across a gradually rising moor towards the bulk of Cruach Mhor.

across the rising moor towards Cruach Mhor (left) and The Big Gun (right)

across the rising moor towards Cruach Mhor (left) and Cnoc na Peiste (right)

The ground gradually steepened, and I zig-zagged up on to Cruach Mhor’s west shoulder.  The drizzle has stopped, the air was warm, and the cloud base had risen to reveal the tops.  Unlike many mountains, Cruach Mhor’s summit cairn is clearly visible from below, but it was a long slog to get there.  At about 700m, Lough Cummeenapeasta came into view, sitting in its beautiful coire, below the 3 eastern peaks: Cruach Mhor, The Big Gun and Cnoc ne Peiste (Hill of the beast).

Lough Cummeenapeasta

Lough Cummeenapeasta

the col between The Big Gun and Cnoc na Peiste above Lough Cummeenapeasta

looking up to the col between The Big Gun and Cnoc na Peiste above Lough Cummeenapeasta

Onward and upward – a steep scramble up a bouldery slope – and suddenly, after 2 hrs 15 mins, I arrived at the first summit.  The mist was just above summit level, allowing about 10 minutes of views before it closed in around me.

looking NE from Cruach Mhor towards Purple Mountain

looking NE from Cruach Mhor's summit cairn towards Purple Mountain

looking SE from Cruach Mhor towards the Upper Lake and Mangerton Mountain

looking SE from Cruach Mhor towards the Upper Lake and Mangerton Mountain (in cloud)

Cruach Mhor’s summit cairn has a strange grotto in its north side.  Apparently, the whole cairn and grotto were built by a local farmer who carried all the cement up in sacks on his back.  One ascent with a small rucsac was enough for me – although it would be nice to go back along the “reeks” on a sunny day with clear views …

the grotto in Cruach Mhor's summit cairn

the grotto in Cruach Mhor's summit cairn

It was time for some lunch, so a 15 minute rest on the summit, before setting off along the rough narrow ridge towards An Gunna Mor (The Big Gun).   The ridge looked fun – almost Cuillin-like in roughness.  The cloud was still coming and going, and a strong wind was blowing across the ridge.

The Big Gun from Cruach Mhor (just before the cloud level dropped)

The Big Gun from the col between it and Cruach Mhor

Although only about 500m away along the ridge, with a drop of about 50m, the ridge took 25 minutes to negotiate, with some interesting scrambles and dodging from one side of the ridge to the other.  A 10 minute rest was enough on The Big Gun’s tiny summit, as the view had gone, and I was running about half and hour behind my estimated schedule.

Pushing on from The Big Gun, the ridge continued rocky.  To Cnoc na Peiste was about 700m in distance, with a drop and rise of about 70m.

looking back at The Big Gun from the ridge to Cnoc na Peasta

looking back at The Big Gun from the ridge to Cnoc na Peasta

Again, just over half an hour of entertaining scrambling, and I arrived on the summit of Cnoc na Peiste – the third “furth” of the day, and the highest of the “reeks”.   By now the view had well and truly disappeared, so there was no point loitering on this, or any of the subsequent tops.  Progress was now much faster, as the narrow rocky ridge gave way to a grassy one beyond Cnoc na Peiste.  Mostly, the ground sloped away down steep grassy/scree slopes to the south, and into craggy corries to the north, but I didn’t see very much of either.  So.. no photos for this section!

10 minutes from Cnoc na Peiste to Maolan Bui, the 4th top, then 20 minutes over a slight bump on the ridge to the 5th top – Cnoc an Chuillin.  This was my final 3000ft top in Ireland, but no celebration – just a 5 minute rest, then on downhill to a col at 768m, before a rise to one more lower top, Cnoc na Toinne (845m).  Beyond this top, the ridge narrowed, and turned into an unpleasant and unavoidable peaty mess.  I was glad to reach the 734m col at the top of the Devil’s Ladder.

looking down the Devil's Ladder from the col

looking down the Devil's Ladder from the col

The Devil’s Ladder proved to be a rather undignified slither down rock, mud and scree, but did have the benefit of being a relatively quick descent!  15 minutes later, I was below the cloud and at the head of Hags Glen, with Lough Gouragh to my left and Lough Callee to my right.

Hags Glen from the Devil's Ladder - sunshine ahead!

Hags Glen from the Devil's Ladder - sunshine ahead!

Stumpa an tSaimh above Lough Gouragh

Stumpa an tSaimh above Lough Gouragh

The Reeks above Lough Callee - still enshrouded in mist!

The Reeks above Lough Callee - still enshrouded in mist!

I was back on the broad “main road” path from Carrauntoohill, and in just over an hour I was back to Cronin’s Yard.  The workmen were still at work on the marquee!

map of route

 

 

Summary:
5 Furths
12 km walk
1100 m climb
7 hours

Log:

Cronin’s Yard (145m) 10:20
Cruach Mhor (932m) 12:35 – 12:50
The Big Gun (939m) 13:15 – 13:25
Cnoc na Peiste (988m) 14:00 – 14:10
Maolan Bui (973m) 14:20 – 14:30
Cnoc an Chuillin (958m) 14:50 – 14:55
top of Devil’s Ladder (734m) 15:35
Hags Glen (400m) 16:10
Cronin’s Yard 17:20

(written and uploaded 21/09/13)

 

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